Nº. 1 of  84

Commonplace Book

A lot of bits and bobs, mostly.

Sometimes I remind myself that I almost skipped the party, that I almost went to a different college, that the whim of a minute could have changed everything and everyone. Our lives, so settled, so specific, are built on happenstance.

—Anna Quindlen, Every Last One   (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: wordsthat-speak, via bitofsilliness)

Blog games! I’ve been tagged by the lovely bitofsilliness and willwritefordietcoke on this post, so here it is!

Rules: In a text post, list ten books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard — they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just the ones that have touched you. Tag ten [I went with five, I’m just not that cool guys] friends, including me, so I’ll see your list. Make sure you let your friends know you’ve tagged them.

  1. Anansi Boys - Neil Gaiman
  2. The Poisonwood Bible - Barbara Kingsolver
  3. The Harry Potter series - J.K. Rowling
  4. Ella Enchanted - Gail Carson Levine
  5. Hope Was Here - Joan Bauer
  6. Much Ado About Nothing - William Shakespeare
  7. The Book Thief - Markus Zusak
  8. Ender’s Game - Orson Scott Card
  9. The Lacuna - Barbara Kingsolver
  10. Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen

I’ll also add an unofficial eleventh to this list of Neil Gaiman’s entire ouvre, from Good Omens to Sandman, because I don’t think I’ve ever found a writer whose work I connected with so much.

Yay books! I’m always bad at the tagging friends part, but here goes:  springsteen, kerfuffleinthecorner, sitaroundandglare, thebeautyoftheunspoken, stolenfromthevalleys, it’s your turn!

not-enough-fandom:

i wanna dress like a post-apocalyptic rebel leader who beheads her enemies while taking shots of whiskey but then again i also want to dress like a very feminine little girl that frolics through fields of lovely flowers, 
my struggle is real

This is a slightly extreme but not entirely inaccurate expression of my thoughts on fashion.

(Source: abaddonsbabe, via accio-pirates)

dragonheartedrabbit:

Going on right now in Ferguson: Police are raiding a church that has been stocked with medical supplies, food, and tear gas recovery kits for community members engaging in protests. This cannot be allowed to continue.

Stand up, speak out. 

(via cleolinda)

Last year, in total, British police officers actually fired their weapons three times. The number of people fatally shot was zero. In 2012 the figure was just one. Even after adjusting for the smaller size of Britain’s population, British citizens are around 100 times less likely to be shot by a police officer than Americans. Between 2010 and 2014 the police force of one small American city, Albuquerque in New Mexico, shot and killed 23 civilians; seven times more than the number of Brits killed by all of England and Wales’s 43 forces during the same period.

The explanation for this gap is simple. In Britain, guns are rare. Only specialist firearms officers carry them; and criminals rarely have access to them. The last time a British police officer was killed by a firearm on duty was in 2012, in a brutal case in Manchester. The annual number of murders by shooting is typically less than 50. Police shootings are enormously controversial. The shooting of Mark Duggan, a known gangster, which in 2011 started riots across London, led to a fiercely debated inquest. Last month, a police officer was charged with murder over a shooting in 2005. The reputation of the Metropolitan Police’s armed officers is still barely recovering from the fatal shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, an innocent Brazilian, in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist bombings in London.

In America, by contrast, it is hardly surprising that cops resort to their weapons more frequently. In 2013, 30 cops were shot and killed—just a fraction of the 9,000 or so murders using guns that happen each year. Add to that a hyper-militarised police culture and a deep history of racial strife and you have the reason why so many civilians are shot by police officers. Unless America can either reduce its colossal gun ownership rates or fix its deep social problems, shootings of civilians by police—justified or not—seem sure to continue.

Armed police: Trigger happy | The Economist (via kenyatta)

(via fishingboatproceeds)

cognitivedissonance:

Tonight in Ferguson, Mo. Even CNN is calling out police brutality.

We are watching history unfold. Do not stand down. Spread the word.

No justice, no peace.

What the actual fuck.

(via karaceae)

cunninghats:

girls don’t like boys. girls like dresses with pockets and guardians of the galaxy

(via backstageleft)

Tibetan Monks living in exile in India flew to Ferguson to show support for Mike Brown and community.

(Source: merosezah, via accio-pirates)

anarcho-queer:

Captain Johnson Breaks Promise, Uses Tear Gas And Military Vehicles Against Ferguson Protesters

August 17th, 2014

Captain Johnson broke a direct promise he made on Saturday when officers and SWAT under his control broke up the night’s demonstration using military-like vehicles and tear gas while enforcing a midnight curfew.

Johnson insisted at a press conference earlier in the day that those methods would not be used.

We won’t enforce it with trucks, we won’t enforce it with tear gas. We’ll communicate. We’ll talk about, you know what, it’s time to go home,” Johnson told a boisterous crowd.

But shortly after midnight, when the curfew went into effect, riot police equipped with rifles, shields and five armored vehicles, shot tear gas and smoke grenades to disperse defying protesters chanting “No Justice, No Curfew”.

It was initially unclear whether tear gas or smoke was volleyed. Police spokesmen on the ground told reporters there that the anti-riot agent they were using was merely smoke.

But several reporters tweeted pictures of the canisters they picked off the ground which showed that riot CS smoke was being used.

Credit

(via accio-pirates)

edwardspoonhands:

notational:

Is there a better way of showing a text message in a film? How about the internet? Even though we’re well into the digital age, film is still ineffective at depicting the world we live in. Maybe the solution lies not in content, but in form.

For educational purposes only. You can follow me at twitter.com/tonyszhou

Here are three short films that take place on your desktop
Internet Story (2010): youtu.be/g-SL4ejpP94
Noah (2013): vimeo.com/81257262
Transformers: the Premake (2014): youtu.be/dD3K1eWXI54

Music:
Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross - In Motion (from The Social Network)
David Arnold & Michael Price - On the Move (from Sherlock)
Daft Punk - End of Line (from Tron: Legacy)
Al Hirt - Green Hornet Theme (from Kill Bill Vol. 1)

NEAT NEAT NEAT NEAT!! Watch this. I wrote my thesis on the relationship between the internet and physical space and my views on it have evolved dramatically since then, but investigating how it is portrayed in film is such a cool way of analyzing it. Still much work to be done…I can’t wait to watch the first movie that takes place entirely on the internet.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Nº. 1 of  84